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You might not have had the pleasure of trying it, but there are few things that tickle a Lithuanian's sweet tooth as much as Šakotis, or Tree Cake. At this museum you’ll not only have a chance to acquaint yourselves with the traditional way it’s prepared, you’ll also have a chance at making your own.
You might not have had the pleasure of trying it, but there are few things that tickle a Lithuanian's sweet tooth as much as Šakotis, or Tree Cake. Called tree cake because it, well, resembles a tree, this is a traditional cake made from butter, egg whites and yolks, flour, sugar, and cream, which is cooked on a rotating spit. Its singular form comes from the way in which it is cooked, and at this museum you’ll not only have a chance to acquaint yourselves with the traditional way it’s prepared, you’ll also have a chance at making your own. Not only that, you’ll learn what the favorite dessert of Lithuania’s most famous female noble was, and also see the biggest “spit cake” in existence, a Guinness Record breaking 3.72 m tall beast. The museum also explores the “spit cake” traditions of other countries like Hungary, Sweden, Japan, and Poland.

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